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of the french over there by the end of the year. but i think what is worth bearing in mind, the u.n. secretary general when he was asked to come up with options, one of his optioning was to send a full blue elemented force, and he said that if the conditions were dangerous on the ground and it is clear from the report, it is extremely dangerous right now, he'd need 9,000 troops on the ground. now that's double what they have agreed to do with today's resolution, appoint, i put the u.s. ambassador to the u.n. have you enough troops for the job. >> we are in this resolution, walking and chews gum at the same time. we are both strengthening the mandate and working through the funding -- on the ground. but they are not yet up to full speed. we need to address that immediately, we are going to need to increase that by mid december. >> they have asked the secretary to continue planning. they say possibly that could be deployed in the future, lauren. the similar chaos that was? at the moment. >> reporting from -- it's much worse around the rest of the country. and what we unction for the moment is th
colleagues up in bossangoa that african forces rescued thousands of displaced people and helping the u.n. they are under the protection of african forces there. they are running out of supplies. they need reinforcements desperately, and need the french to head up to those parts of the country to protect people. >> live for us in bangui. jackie row land live in paris. >> the car merritting a lot of discussion but not the only discussion in paris. it's continent wide, isn't it, this discussion. >> it is, and the way that francis hollande sums up the equation in his opening remarks on friday with security and development, he sees the two as being inextricably linked and the economic development of the continent being vital for improving the security situation. he read out of list of countries gripped by terrorism, and mentioned mali, libya, since the revolution, kenya, where there was the attack on the shopping mall and somali where there's ongoing violence. what francis hollande was aiming for as a new partnership whereby africa would be responsible for its security with help, support and
route taken by the u.s. and n.a.t.o., protesting against the drone atakes in the tribal regions which killed dozens of civilians. >> the security deal with the united states is in jeopardy if hamid karzai doesn't sign. that's the message. an n.a.t.o. summit is being attended in brussels. paul brennan is there for us. why can't n.a.t.o. wait for a signature until after the april elections as hamid karzai wants? >> basically because n.a.t.o. says it would be too late to do that. they need a degree of certainty. they are pressing on hamid karzai to sign the agreement because he has agreed to it in principal with talks with secretary of state john kerry. there are budgetary cycles, planning cycles. you can't switch on and off military trainers. they need a degree of certainty for this to happen. if we don't get the signature on that the zero option will have to be on the table and that is an option where the troops will have to be pulled out. it's an option at this point, nout one they are afraid of threatening, if hamid karzai does not sign the agreement. john kerry described it as needi
, in the central african republic, it has led the calls for the u.n. to send in peacekeepers. a muslim leader set himself as leader. they have been accused of committing atrocities against christians. there are reports that christians set up their own groups, but are accused of attacking civilians. desperate civilians were camped at the airport in bangui. >> soldiers are protecting the runway here. the french have a strong u.n. mandate to protect civilians in this country. the airport is completely entry. there are no civilian planes, only military. there's a humanitarian crisis developing. thousands of people have come to the airport because they have nowhere else to go. seleka and anti-balaka are targetting people in their homes. this is the only place they feel safe. >> translation: everyone you see here is a christian. we have no protection. the muslims have sell eka to look after them. we are all central africans, but there is no one to look after us. >> translation: there's nothing to drink or eat. we don't have money to buy anything. >> there are some international charities that are helpi
last march, today the u.n. security council approved the peace keeping force to end the violence, french president announced he would double the troops perhaps within hours. >> i have decided to react immediately. starting tonight, with the african forces and for the support of the european partners. >> there are conflicting numbers of the dead. in bagn where ohs are hoping that help comes soon. >> they are very much in control of the capitol now. and they are based just outside what is the main hospital here, where the injuries are -- and the dead are being brought. they have told us that more than 1,000 of the militia, that have carried out the attacks have been killed or run away. let's take a look inside the hospital, where you can see the injured people who are being treated. namely by doctors without boarders. now, we have seen people here who have gunshot injuries, rbg injuries and also machete injuries as well. now is situation in this city seems to be calming down, but the issue now, particularly for the international community is what to do about the escalating violence
with our u.n. and ngo partners who have a lot of skill addicts. doing programs that basically provide a decent wage in return for clearing debris away. this would be a huge challenge, an important challenge. unfortunately or fortunately, the philippines have a fair amount of experience in dealing with debris. it is a scale issue in this sense and will be an area of the media focus has been lookahead. you've raised some of the other associated concerns about disease with debris and for that reason, the fogginess a very important approach because there's standing water. the other issue of coors is there still pulling bodies out from underneath these mountains of debris and that will likely remain an ongoing effort as they work their way through the recovery. i'm trafficking, this has been an area of concern in the philippines for some time. in fact, the united states has put about $11 million into counter trafficking programming in the philippines. we work closely with them and called the philippines interagency council for counter trafficking. there is a need to remain very vigilant ab
is the former deputy president of the south africa and serves as the u.n. undersecrety general and executive director of u.n. women. it is good to see you. >> good to see you. >> can you tell me what ofs it like to work in south africa, in the government. >> specifically under nelson mandela, it was - at a time when we had just gotten into government so everything was new for all of us. we were optimistic, highly motivated, and to work for someone like him, who worked around the clock, you felt that you had to be up and about doing your work, because that's what the boss is doing, and he was much older than you. you had no excuse to be tilered. >> you had so much hope, yet the changes that he faced and you faced as a government were enormous. reconciliation grew out of that. how did it happen. >> when he came out of prison. when he took the step to become the president of the country. he was single-minded about making south africa work for everybody. and to the extent that he made it to reconcile with those that were used to oppress us, he was convinced that it was not too difficult and too
and interreligious crimes that can degenerate. the security council and i welcome the u.n. secretary general ban ki-moon who has given a mandate to re-establish order to protect the population and to insure stability that then lead to elections. >> more now on our top story. the death of nelson mandela. south africa's foreign minister. at mandela's insistence. he served in the first post apartheid government. >> that kept nelson mandela in jail, and he then served under mandela in south africa's first cabinet. it was his task to publicly defend the continued imprisonment of mandela and other political developments. privately he long lobbied for mandela's release. >> due to the effect that mandela ought to be released that we are making a bigger martyr of him every day that he stays in prison. and that is international acclaim. and it would be growing to an extent that we would not be able to hand it will any longer. unfortunately at that time it was. >> eight years later nelson mandela bake a free man. >> he spent 27 years in prison. and the day he was released he displayed the--he displayed the ac
1600 groups in the colony and u.n. improved an increase to 6,000. another attack in iraq as violence escalates and a car bomb exploded outside of a cafe in the northeast region killing 11 people and explosions on sunday killed 39 and injured more than 120. most of those attacks happened on busy commercial streets. u.n. says 8,000 iraqis have been killed this year. drone strikes and taliban were the topics today during high-level meetings in pakistan and chuck hagel met with sharif and the army chief and this is the first since the tirade that killed bin laden in 2011 and he flew and met with troops but not the president and hamid karzai is refusing to sign before the year's end. they are backing the afghan counterparts decision for the deal and karzai met in tehran sunday with rohani and calling for trade and security and they opposed the presence of troops in afghanistan, the only country asking karzai not to sign the security deal. the security agreement would secure billions of dollars afghanistan needs to boost economy but in limbo the currency is falling and as al jazeera jayne
under nelson mandela in the first democratic cabinet. as u.n. ambassador and foreign minister, it was his task to publicly defend the yisent of nelson mandela and other political opponents. privately he maintains he lobbied for nelson mandela's release. >> in 1982 i submitted a memorandum prepared by my department. and to the effect that nelson mandela ought to be released. we were making a bigger martyr of you every day stays in prison. that is international. and status. would be growing to an extent where he would not be able to handle it. eight years later nelson mandela became a free man. here you had a man who spent 27 years in prison and the day he was released. he displayed the - he displayed the cuban and energy to the person. who has been a president before. amazing what this idea, in the minds of people and for that matter, into world affairs. >> and central to the success of the process, that led to a peaceful transfer of power, was nelson mandela's insistence that there need be no losers, that all could win. >> we were not capitulating. you do not capitulate and
justice. may god bless his memory and keep him in peace. >> u n secretary-general bank human also commented -- banking i-moon alsok commented on nelson mandela. >> i am just going to the for at to go to paris subcommittee meeting. when i heard this very sad news of president mandela's passing, i thought that i would say in person something on behalf of the united nations. the profoundly saddened by passing of nelson mandela. nelson mandela was a giant for justice and a talent for human inspiration. many around the world were greatly influenced by his selfless struggle for human dignity, equality, and freedom. he touched our lives in deeply personal ways. at the same time, don't ignore in our time to advance the values of the united nations. nelson mandela showed what is possible for our world. and within each one of us, if we walked together for justice and humanity. his moral cause was decisive in dismantling the system of apartheid. 27arkably, he emerged from years of detention without rancor to build a new south africa based on dialogue and reconciliation. i was released to mee
with the tree might do in three months. the u n s team donkey who will suggest real. for four c at the possibility to transform this cat into a year during peacekeeping operation. this condition. maybe it's the first step on to the media new solution which would guarantee two in baltimore in the east african soldiers east african countries into peacekeeping operations that are happening and the african continent. we we all know that most of the peacekeeping operations since the nineteen nineteen pc since continuing into existence to existing. they have been deployed in africa open to litigate result he has the consent of the one of these were good reasons for being decent to good results for the killing of resources because most of the conclusions can be composed of african soldiers still reading but also solve the issue for this purpose the asian or african armies and i think this is plain that seem to think that you get the solution presented at the itu t three t so cause i think it's been in the corner that is a lot of work to do it's exactly the same prose is like in many r
border are. >> the u.n. refugee agency agrees. >> often, there's a lot more check points in dallas, there's certainly a lot of fighting going on there. as you can see, this is a very different location that people find. this is an easier place to come through. >> it will take up to four days for the refugees to oh get screened, registered and taken to a camp. their longer journey is the one that's yet to start. that's the one for human dignity in compile. >> protestors in ukraine returned to the street in force today, this after reports the country's president met with the russian president. the meeting sparked fears an economic deal might be reached with russia quarterback further distancing the ukraine from the europeandown. >> there are reports that the ukrainian leader has signed a deal with russia securing according to reports, $17 billion worth of aid. ukraine, of course, desperately needs this money, simply to pay its creditors, the country's reserves are starting to run low, and it is in dire economic circumstances. these reports about the deal with russia are unconfirmed, but of
implicated the syrian president and more than 100,000 people have been killed in the conflict. the u.n. says afghanistan is the world east most dangerous place for relief worker and said attacks on aid workers fripelled there and 36 have been killed and 46 injured and u.n. are not saying blame for attacks but taliban has taken responsible for many of them. activists including one american boerted boats in the gaza strip with restrictions on waterways in the mediterranean sea. israeli government said imports are monitored to prevent dangerous materials from entering occupied territory and the six mile restrictions hurt the economy and al jazeera's nick has more from jerusalem. >> six years israel controlled the seas and today activists wanted to take them back and living in gaza cannot go six miles from the coast and war ships block everything going in and going out and they say that strangled the economy and so they challenge the blockade and going straight for israeli ships and aware of the risk and they arrested and they attacked for sailing more than six miles out. >> we are armed with in
from the national institute of health, and michelle from u.n. aids, and debra who is carrying on the great work as the acting global aids coordinator and many friends from the philanthropic world including bill gates, so, thank you, all, for joining us here today. every year, this is a moment to reflect on how far we've come since early days of the aids end epidemic, and those of you who lived through it remember all too well the fear and the stigma and how hard people with hiv had to fight to be heard or be treated with decent compassion. you remember how little we knew how to prevent aids or how it treat it. what we knew is the devastation inflected, striking down vibrant men and women in the time of their lives spreading to city to city, country to country seemingly overnight. today, that picture has transformed thanks to the courage and love of some of you in this room and around the world awareness soars, research surged, prevention, treatment, and care save millions of lives in the richest countries and the world's poorest countries as well. for many, with testing and ac
-term. i will say that was very positive. the u.n. as well use whatever shelter models of the cluster key model into the future. the u.n. is thought that time, particularly unicef and osha are particularly strong right out of the gate. i would just reiterate this type of the dvds. i would also say as he spoke about the misrepresentative green mentioned, you sound like we've been in the same areas in pakistan and tsunami penalties stiffer and emergencies emergencies a sitcom for that i think there's been a lot of learning that has gone on. frankly this nominee was the first time we really worked closely with the american military setting up temporary bridges to get to violence and locations that were completely transfigured as the geography had changed. in haiti as well, the military came up in the philippines. i know in haiti the u.s. military tried to do with a lighter footprint, with a letter president never going in providing assistance. in the philippines from a came in, there is joy for most of the people we talked to roll around. it is very, very impressive. even in the media outlet
existing u.n. resolutions and previous violations by iran of its international obligations, that we don't recognize such a right, and if, by the way, negotiations break down, there will be no additional international recognition that's been obtained. so this deal goes away and we're back to where we were before the geneva agreement, subject -- and iran will continue to be subject to all the sanctions that we put in place in the past and we may seek additional ones. but i think what we have said is we can envision a comprehensive agreement that involves extraordinary constraints and verification mechanisms and intrusive inspections, but that permits iran to have a peaceful nuclear program. now, in terms of specifics, we know that they don't need to have an underground, fortified facility like fordow in order to have a peaceful nuclear program. they certainly don't need a heavy-water reactor at arak in order to have a peaceful nuclear program. they don't need some of the advanced centrifuges that they currently possess in order to have a limited, peaceful nuclear program. and so the quest
with the danger of flooding coast receding late tomorrow. the u.n. security council authorized new military action in the war-torn central african republic today. the former french colony has descended into chaos since a coup last march. a reported 100 people died today as muslims and christians battled in the capital. in yemen, a coordinated attack killed more than 50 people at the defense ministry. the victims were medical staffers, including a number of foreigners. smoke billowed after a suicide bomber drove a car packed with explosives through the complex's gates. the blast cleared the way for a vehicle full of gunmen in army uniforms to storm the compound. an american teacher-- ronnie smith-- was shot to death today in benghazi, libya, by unknown gunmen. he taught chemistry at the international school there. local officials said he'd been jogging near the u.s. consulate, where the ambassador and three other americans were killed last year. the quarterback for top-ranked florida state university will not face sexual assault charges. a woman had accused jameis winston of raping her last decembe
welcome the u.n. secretary general ban ki-moon, who has given a mandate to an african force to protect the population and ensure stability that would then lead to election. >> our correspondent is in central african report and we have this report on the violence that has taken over bangui. >> reporter: gunfire echos through the city. [ sirens ] >> reporter: some say this was an attempted coup d'État. security forces called celica. the streets of this once bustling city are almost deserted. those who venture out risk ending up like this. it's not clear how many people have died in this mortuary we counted 25 bodies. this woman lost her son. she didn't want to give us her name. >> i don't know what is happening in central african republic right now. if you go in you see people on the ground like animals who have been slaughtered. with the state of the country, where can i go? >> this is where most of the injured have been brought. most have wounds, women are being treated along side government soldiers. [ sobbing ] >> this woman asked god, why has this happened? there christian and musl
reflections. >>> coming up, mr. bob beckle was down at his house in d.c. last weekend putting u.n. h int christmas lights. we're not sure how hard he actually worked. don't miss the annual light show. bob's just talking away. he's very excited. we've got a special package for you and it's coming up. huma. even when weross our t's and dot our i's, we still run io problems. namely, other humans. which is why, at liberty mutual insurance, auto policies come with new car replacement and accident forgiveness if you qualify. see what else comes standard at libertymutual.com. liberty mutual insurance. responsibility. what's your policy? and our giant idaho potato truck is still missing. so my dog and i we're going to go find it. it's out there somewhere spreading the good word about idaho potatoes and raising money for meals on wheels. but we'd really like our truck back, so if you see it, let us know, would you? thanks. what? ♪ always believe in your soul ♪ you've got the power to know >>> welcome back to "the five." i don't know what shawn was thinking. president obama claims income inequ
inspectors from the u.n.'s nuclear watchdog toured the heavy water reactor at iraq. a sign that while there's plenty of scepticism some progress was already under way. robert, the president towed a careful line here. i thought his remarks were interesting. it seems like we're in the middle of what our good friend david axelrod likes to call kabuki theater, confident but not overconfident. i wonder about the deal back and forth between president obama and members of his own congress like bob menendez pushing this renewed sanctions deal. >> i do think you've got the potential collision of a lot of different time lines. the president, i think, is realistic to say there's a possibility of a deal but the deal can long move forward long-term if iranians are willing to do things. if he understands that from colliding time lines politically you've got congressional members from both parties pursuing sanctions. you've got israelis against this deal. i think the one important thing the president has in his pocket, so to speak, the american people are supportive of a deal because they are so incredibl
. largest gathering of heads of state outside of u.n. perhaps ever. we'll have to see how this day goes. and of course, there will be tens of thousands of people, perhaps millions of people, trying to get near the soccer stadium where this event will take place. it begins at 11:00 a.m. local time, 4:00 a.m. eastern time. either supposed to last for about four hours. we understand from the list of speakers that several of nelson mandela's grandchildren will speak, also his co-defendants convicted with mandela in 1963 and sentenced to a life in prison on robben island. one of them will speak as well as heads of state, president obama, president of brazil, china, india, raoul castro of cuba. this country has been friends and allies for some time. quite a day ahead of us, andrea. that's just one day. there will be several days where nelson mandela's body will lie in state at the union building at the national capital here and, of course, culminating event, the funeral in the eastern province. a poor rural area which was nelson mandela's homeland underscoring his very humble beginnings where
. in fact, tonight at the u.n. security council not far from where we are now, they are calling a moment of silence to remember and to honor him. he was the most incredible leader for our time, especially as we know, the possibility of violence, of division, of paralysis and partisanship, he really was able to overcome that and his long walk to freedom has benefited the whole world and how ironic it is that the film of his own biography is coming out right now. there are premieres right now, last week in the kennedy center in washington, tonight in london, where his own daughter has been, and there is so much now that is coming out for people to be able to read and to reflect and to pause and remember just what gift this amazing man gave to the world. i interviewed f.w. de clerk, who was his partner in the end and the dismantling of apartheid, one of the world's most violent racist regimes that endured for so long, a
was with them when they went to the u.n. and asked for the removal of sanctions, to be around this man who had such gravitas, but humaniility at th same time was an awesome experience. >> you were there, as the reverend was just mentioning to see that first democratic election in south africa, in which nelson mandela was elected the first democratic president of that country. >> i was there. and let me say, chris, that my heart is very heavy tonight. the people of south africa, the people of the world, we've lost a great warrior, a great leader. i also have to say, the lessons we've learned from president mandela are so, so great. and being there as an election observer is one of the moments i will always remember. because these elections were very difficult. when i landed, the first task we had was to monitor the -- and reverend al, you may remember this, the cleanup of a bomb blast that was palablasted out front of the anc headquarters. i think 30 people died. so these elections, nelson mandela did not take lightly. the people of south africa did not take lightly. but they waited in line. it
, nelson mandela, was announced by jacob zuma. esther mandela was 95 years old. at the u.n., the security council held a moment of silence and the secretary-general spoke to reporters with comments that are just under 10 minutes. >> good evening, ladies and gentlemen, thank you for this opportunity. said, i'mkesperson just going to the airport to go an african attend subcommittee meeting in paris. i hope this very sad news of mandela's passing -- i hope to say in person something -- i am profoundly saddened by the passing of nelson mandela great else in mandela was a giant for justice and eight down to earth human inspiration. many around the world were greatly influenced by his suffering for human dignity, and human feeling. he touched our lives and deeply personal ways. at the same time, no one did more in our time to advance the values and aspirations of the united nations. nelson mandela showed what is possible for our world. within each one of us, if we believe, when men work together for justice and dignity. decisive inrce was dismantling the system of apartheid. he emerged from a 2
and muslim rebels. soldiers reached the city this morning, with the permission of the u.n. security council to use force. the french contingent will eventually reach 1,200. the embattled president of ukraine-- viktor yanukovych-- met today with russian president vladimir putin, in the face of ongoing protests back home. the demonstrations erupted after ukraine's leaders backed away from improving ties with the european union. moscow wants ukraine to join a trade bloc dominated by russia, instead. still to come on the "newshour": good jobs news, but not for the long-term unemployed; fast-food workers fight for a living wage; what mandela meant for south africa. plus, shields and brooks. >> woodruff: now, a pair of reports from the jobs front about a divide in the u.s. economy: the labor market seems to be getting stronger once again. yet for many on the lower end of the income ladder, the big gap in wages is sparking a budding movement. we begin with economics correspondent paul solman on the unemployment rate's drop to a five-year low, even as many jobless americans face more difficult time
. and not on the situation. >> the u.n. refugee agency agrees. >> there's more checkpoints in dara and a lot of fighting going on. as you can see, this is a quit location. this is an easier place to come through. >> it will take up to four days for the refugees to get screened, registered and taken to camp. the longer journey, however is yet to start. that is the search for security and human dignity in exile. >> more than 1,000 syrian refugees crossed into jordan in recent days. many walked six miles through the dessert. >> protests in ukraine are in the third week. widespread demonstrations in the capital started after the president backed away from an agreement with the european union. the deal w the deal was -- russia pressured them to sign a deal >> paying tribute to nelson mandela. a live report where a nation continues to honour the man they call father. >> plus, the changes ordered in the wake of last week's deadly commuter train derailment. >> i'm john henry smith. she them the money. someone has. it wasn't the yankees. details ahead in sport. >> start with one issue. add guests from all sides
general on behalf of the u.n. response appreciation. we appreciate you taking the time to speak to us. is there any single message that nelson has made throughout the years that run particularly true with you. and you think applies today in africa and throughout the rest of the world? one of the thing he often said was that the whole cause of freedom was still a work in progress. >> africa had many countries in the world during last century and many centuries before have suffered from this rule. and violation of the human right and human dignity. only because of such a great man like nelson mandela is possible that particular people in africa and elsewhere are able to enjoy freedom and human dignity. i'm still very much humbled. many people, particularly people -- [inaudible] totally abuse and violated. we have to learn the wisdom and determinations and commitment from all of president mandela to make this world better. that is what i really wanted to exprez my deepest admiration and respect to president mandela and people of south africa. and all people of africa. thank you very much
, the brazilian president and french president, u.n. secretary-general and more. as a way of facilitating this massive logistical challenge the government deployed some 11,000 troops to make sure as the interest builds it's on the fourth of the tenth day of mourning people are safe and there are no snags having so many vips here in the country. tomorrow's event, the tuesday memorial service which possibly could be attended by the u.s. president will be the first formal event, followed by nelson mandela's lying in-state at the union building in pretoria wednesday through friday. significant, john, because it was 20 years ago he was sworn in as president at that location. so a euphoric week for a country bidding farewell to a man they credit for bringing people together. >> errol barnett, with unshakeable concentration in johannesburg, the celeb brags going on around you, a fitting tribute to nelson mandela, thank you so much. >>> the bcs game the tightlogical go out with a bang, florida state battling auburn, auburn wrapped up a worst to first season in the sec and florida state took the a
that the president has announced ignores not only u.s. law but ignores the u.n. sanctions that are in place. and it also ignores the fact that iran has not made any concessions in this area in the last 30 years. it also ignores the position that this deal puts israel in, one that is untenable and more impossible than any i have seen in my lifetime. the naivity of this administration in dealing with iran is something that is simply breathtaking. mr. speaker, i would just suggest to you that if iran gains nuclear weapons, we will need a new calendar. it will change our reality in the world that much. and i would say to you that while there's still time, we need to act. d you know, mr. speaker, there is that moment in the life of every problem when it is big enough to be seen and still small enough to be addressed but in terms of iran's nuclear weapons pursuit, that window is closing quickly. and whatever this body can do, whatever this president can do to prevent iran from gaining a nuclear weapons capability must be done soon because soon they will have the ability to ignore our treaties and
talks about the man we didn't know. >>> south africa has begun ten n days of remembrance for nelson mandela. people have been placing flowers and ca candles outside of his he in johannesburg. mandela will be buried a week from sunday. >>> u.s. unemployment rate dropped to a low of 5%. despite the sol li solid gains e wages barely increased. >>> merle newman an 85-year-old american veteran is freed tonight. he was detained by north korea for a month here is new video of him arriving at the airport in beijing. >>> melissa chan is following the story from san francisco tonight. and melissa we saw the images of mermerle, newman in china. >> well merle new maman is homer the holidays. the north core agre koreans arey unpredictable. the one thing belearned about newman is he was not entirely a normal soldier. he was part of the white tiger a special unit. so see ci see cit secret we didt it until the 19 1990's. kekenneth bay is still being hed what is the possibility that because newman was released that bay has a better chance of getting out as well. >> that san excellent question. >> wh
to subvert the protections of section 365-n for u.s. intellectual property by filing bankruptcy in a foreign country and demanding that u.s. courts extend comity, termination of licenses to intellectual property in the foreign proceeding. the provision that the gentleman wants would eliminate important provisions, and the -- that would eliminate -- i'm sorry -- the underlying bill provisions eliminate this uncertainty and would guarantee that licenses to u.s. patents and other i.p. will always be protected in u.s. courts. the gentleman wants something that would undermine that. failing to include this provision, a manufacturer deciding where to build a new fabrication plant would invest his resources in a foreign country that protects i.p. licenses instead of in the united states. the substitute would -- i'm sorry -- the gentleman's provision that he'd like to see in the manager's amendment would encourage offshoring of u.s. manufacturing. so i strongly support the language in the manager's amendment and object to the suggestion that his provision that's not in this amendment, which we'll al
a statement on the death of nelson mandela from the white house. what impacts has nelson mandela had on u.s. president politics? >> two things. first of all, i did want to make a point, which in south africa, there is actually going to be a lot of impact here. he a.n.c. has elections coming up, and they have had a hard time of it. the economy has had a difficult time. the a.n.c. has never gotten since 2% of the vote mandela was in charge of the country. they were set to under perform, and now they are not. now the vote turn out will be great, and it will be very solidly pro a.n.c. the legacy of mandela is really going to matter there. for the united states, in recent years mandela has had the kind of impact that martin luther king had. -- unifying union figure that gets beyond race. some of the best moments that you see in american statesmanship reflects the kind of rhetoric and ideals that mandela actually lived by. but when you look at congress today, when you look at what happened to obama in the knife years since he was initially elected, i think we are very r, sadly, from mandela's
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